Today we will talk about the four most common and known scientists search engine.

Scopus

Scopus is a bibliographic database containing abstracts and citations for academic journal articles. It covers nearly 22,000 titles from over 5,000 publishers, of which 20,000 are peer-reviewed journals in the scientific, technical, medical, and social sciences (including arts and humanities). It is owned by Elsevier and is available online by subscription. Searches in Scopus also incorporate searches of patent databases.

Members of Universities (including students of all degrees), Public Research, Technology Centers, Science Parks Service, Agricultural Research Service, Health Research and Public Administration R & D has access through the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT).

Link: https://www.recursoscientificos.fecyt.es

Web of Science

Web of Science (previously known as (ISI) Web of Knowledge) is an online subscription-based scientific citation indexing service maintained by Thomson Reuters that provides a comprehensive citation search. It gives access to multiple databases that reference cross-disciplinary research, which allows for in-depth exploration of specialized sub-fields within an academic or scientific discipline. Web of Science consist of seven online databases: Conference Proceedings Citation Index, Science Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index,  Arts & Humanities Citation Index, Index Chemicus, Current Chemical Reactions, and Book Citation Index.

Members of Universities (including students of all degrees), Public Research, Technology Centers, Science Parks Service, Agricultural Research Service, Health Research and Public Administration R & D has access through the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT).

Link: https://www.recursoscientificos.fecyt.es

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) is a website that lists open access journals and is maintained by Infrastructure Services for Open Access (IS4OA). The project defines open access journals as scientific and scholarly journals that meet high quality standards by exercising peer review or editorial quality control and “use a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access.”The Budapest Open Access Initiative’s definition of open access is used to define required rights given to users, for the journal to be included in the DOAJ, as the rights to “read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of these articles”. The aim of DOAJ is to “increase the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals thereby promoting their increased usage and impact.”

Link: https://doaj.org

Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text or metadata of scholarly literature across an array of publishing formats and disciplines. Released in beta in November 2004, the Google Scholar index includes most peer-reviewed online journals of Europe and America’s largest scholarly publishers,[citation needed] plus scholarly books and other non-peer reviewed journals. While Google does not publish the size of Google Scholar’s database, third-party researchers estimated it to contain roughly 160 million documents as of May 2014 and an earlier statistical estimate published in PLOS ONE using a Mark and recapture method estimated approximately 80-90% coverage of all articles published in English. Despite being the largest database in the world, it is important to know that the quality criteria to appear in it are very low, so you can easily find publications with a very low scientific quality.

Link: https://scholar.google.com